In the Press - Mission Impossible at Chequers

21 February 2018
The Financial Times
Charles Grant, head of the Centre for European Reform, highlights this thinking in a piece for Politico. He notes that the 27 are more divided on the future relationship than they were on the first phase of the Brexit talks.He says that some governments are uncomfortable with the hard line taken by the Germans, the French and the commission and point out that the UK’s trade with the EU is eight times that of Canada’s and that Britain and the EU will want a much closer relationship in areas like security, foreign policy and research. “This camp includes Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Portugal, Italy, Croatia, Hungary, Poland and possibly Spain.”

In the Press - EU could demand freedom of movement after Brexit in return for going easy on bankers

20 February 2018
The Telegraph
But John Springford, deputy director of the Centre for European Reform, said the EU would treat Britain as harshly as Switzerland, which was forced to back down after a referendum demanded an end to free movement. The Swiss-EU agreement does not cover services, he added. “Most countries do not want to lose young, skilled people to the UK, as it erodes their tax base. And unless the UK signed up to free movement pretty much as it is now, the deal will be a much more limited Free Trade Agreement,” he told The Telegraph. 

In the Press - Tory MPs' hard Brexit letter to May described as ransom note

20 February 2018
The Guardian
Sam Lowe, a trade expert at the Centre for European Reform, told the Guardian: “A standstill transition is in everyone’s interest and absolutely essential if the government is serious about negotiating a mutually beneficial ongoing relationship between the EU and UK. In trying to undermine that the ERG are asking the government to sacrifice the economy on the altar of ideology.”

In the Press - Theresa May, in Munich, calls for swift security pact and offers concession

17 February 2018
The New York Times
Charles Grant, director of the Centre for European Reform, a pro-European think-tank based in London, called it “serious and detailed,” noting Mrs May’s expertise on the subject as former home secretary.

In the Press - Theresa May wants new security treaty with EU next year

17 February 2018
The Guardian
“Theresa May is right to warn against letting ideology get in the way of security,” said Sophia Besch of the Centre for European Reform. “But her message should be directed not just at the EU, she needs to say the same to Brexiters at home who categorically oppose the ECJ on ideological grounds.”

In the Press - Boris Johnson struggles to woo remainers with Brexit lovebomb

14 February 2018
The Guardian
John Springford, deputy director of the Centre for European Reform, argued there was no evidence that British regulation was more effective than the EU’s. He pointed out that productivity was 20-25% lower in the UK than in France and Germany, and that the big technological developments were emerging from the US.

In the Press - Brussels should not ‘humiliate’ Britain in the Brexit talks or the whole EU could collapse, key Macron ally warns Michel Barnier

13 February 2018
The Sun
Charles Grant, the director of the Centre for European Reform, said many EU countries were unhappy with the pair and the Commission “on the narrow scope of the deal that they appear to want to offer UK”.

In the Press - EU endgame is political unity not free trade, argues Boris Johnson

12 February 2018
The Guardian
Charles Grant, the director of the Centre for European Reform, said Johnson was right that the founding fathers of the EU wanted to create a united Europe through economic integration – but argued that the result was the world’s most open trading bloc. “That meant that the EU had to be a liberalising project, in the sense of removing barriers to the free flow of people, capital, goods and services,” he said, arguing that required mutual recognition of standards.

In the Press - EU rebellion: A dozen member states revolt against Barnier's 'hard line' Brexit stance

12 February 2018
The Express
Director of the Centre for European Reform, Charles Grant, tweeted: “About 10/12 EU states have some concerns about the ‘hard’ line taken by France, Germany and Commission, particularly on the narrow scope of the deal that they appear to want to offer the UK.” However, Mr Grant said these 12 countries “have different priorities and no leader” so France, Germany and the Commission could win the battle. 

In the Press - Brexit: The impossible job? A guide to the roadblocks facing the PM

10 February 2018
The Guardian
Charles Grant, director of the Centre for European Reform, said: “There is a growing sense in Brussels that because the British are raising new difficulties on the transition, it will not be possible to agree it at the March summit.” Lack of clarity on what the UK wants for the long term, Grant added, creates a risk that the EU will just dictate the terms of discussions from now on. “The longer the British delay saying what they want in terms of a future relationship, the greater the danger that the EU imposes something very narrow like a Canada-style agreement.”

In the Press - Up to twelve European countries rebel against Barnier's plot to punish UK for Brexit by offering 'narrow' trade deal

12 February 2018
The Sun
Now a top EU expert has claimed there are up to 12 member states warning Mr Barnier not to be too tough - and calling for a wide-ranging trade deal. They fear the EU will end up hurting itself by cutting off trade with Britain, Charles Grant of the Centre for European Reform suggested. But he added that the rebel countries may be unable to take on Mr Barnier - because they can't agree on what they want him to do differently.

In the Press - The Waugh Zone Monday February 12, 2018

12 February 2018
The Huffington Post
David Davis’s speech to business about Brexit (which won’t be this week) could be the real one to watch. And he may be cheered up by Charles Grant, of the Centre for European Reform, who tweeted yesterday that up to 12 EU states “have some concerns about the ‘hard’ line taken” on Brexit by France, Germany and the European Commission, “particularly on the narrow scope of the deal that they appear to want to offer UK”.